Tundra Swans, Yellowstone

Friday, August 31, 2012

Don't Throw Your Love on Me So Strong



I don't know why I love Bloomfield so much, could it be the mere reason that we have the same hair? I consider him the gold standard for blues guitar. I was reading some guitar maven who wrote that Bloomfield set the until Clapton came along, who was "so much more lyrical." I don't agree. City blues is spare, a bit drier, Michael's musical integrity just bursts forth on all of his recordings.  In a way and authenticity that Clapton doesn't touch. American player playing American music. With a perfect tone. At least for me.

I saw him after the comeback at the tribal stomp, once earlier in the park. He was revered by both whites and blacks and had credibility in the black community. Great story of him in a book I read about chastising a black guy exhibiting poor behavior and disrespect, in the line at the Apollo no less. Serious huevos.

This is the way I would play blues if I could. Throw a dash of Albert Collins in too for seasoning. Of course as I heard last year, nowadays only forty plus jewish accountants listen to the blues...

8 comments:

NYSTAN said...

yeah-I loved those guys...Butterfield...the whole white Chicago scene was cool.....UNTIL I got to go on the road with Muddy Waters.....fathers and sons....The fathers paid the real dues. Muddy and many of his peers grew up in the rural south on cotton plantations....the white kids grew up in middle class neighborhoods. I think the style of the next generation was more of an affectation, and I don't mean it as a negative. Believe me, I love Bloomfield and for that matter, the guy who replaced him in the BBB was no slouch, Buzzy Feiten....and how's about Lowell George or Al Wilson from Canned Heat? That was the golden age of the coming of the white SONS....but now, as I get really fucking old, I enjoy listening to the originals...Lightnin, the Wolf etc.....nobody can touch that shit....NOBODY....JOhn Lee Hooker???? That is sacred ground....just saying....and also cause I knew Al Kooper pretty well and he was one cynical motherfucker....and none of the Fathers, at least the ones I ever knew were...they were humble and respectful and most of all, loved the music for what it was....anyways, love this track, but to my ears, in comparison to what else was going on in the late 60's sounds, as does Clapton back then, a bit naive and derivative. Not that there is anything wrong with that!!! Good find there...you should have a show on SIRIUS!!

Blue Heron said...

I know what you are saying. But the father's were drinking whisky, the sons were psychedelic. Don't know if you remember but it changes things a little bit. Quite a different thing to "have on your mind." Or so, I am told.

BTW, Feiten played with Johnette Napolitano, one of my faves.

NYSTAN said...

Buzzy ended up moving to LA and became a very respected session guitarist-played on a Janis Ian record with Billy Paine...and Lee Sklar...that was some bunch of players-and the best stuff was between the takes...lol. I agree about the drugs and booze etc and yeah, the sons were experimental. Bless them for that. My favorite Fathers and Sons moment, or one of them, was spending the day with Keith Richards and Muddy-me a silent fly on the wall-that was in early 71.

Anonymous said...

HERES ONE YOU MIGHT DIG- L.A. , SHRINE AUDITORIUM PINNACLE CONCERT AROUND '68? ELECTRIC FLAG PLAYING AT EARL WARREN , SANTA BARBARA AND HELICOPTORING DOWN TO L.A. FOR A MIDNIGHT SHOW-
BLOOMFIELD QUITS THE BAND ON THE CHOPPER! I AM BACKSTAGE , HEAR THIS , AND WALK UP TO HARVEY BROOKS AND BUDDY MILES AND BASICALLY TELL THEM I WANT TO TAKE THE GUITAR SPOT !
I HAD FEARLESS BALLS BACK THEN! AND THEY DO IT! HAD TO BORROW A GUITAR FROM LOU REED / VELVETS THAT WAS TUNED DOWN TO D AND HE SAID NOT TO RETUNE [ A GIBSON S G I THINK}- SO I HAD TO TRANSPOSE EVERYTHING-
BUDDY SAYS " JUST COMP AND I'LL TAKE OVER". - SO WE OPEN WITH A LONG VAMP ON" SMOKESTACK LIGHTNIN " , THE CURTAINS OPEN , THE CROWD ROARS , AND 20 SECONDS LATER ABOUT A THOUSAND PEOPLE ARE CHANTING " WHERE'S BLOOMFIELD" ? IT WAS ALL TIME GREAT !!! -YES , I LOVED MICHAEL SO MUCH ; LUCKY TO SEE THE ORIGINAL BUTTERFIELD BAND WITH ELVIN ETC. IN A SMALL DIVE BAR IN L.A. THE FIRST TIME THEY EVER CAME WEST. THE 'IT' CLUB ON LA BREA / PICO? - PREVIOUS WEEKS WERE SONNY ROLLINS AND THEN RASHAN ROLAND KIRK- BASICALLY NO WHITE FOLKS AND I WAS LIKE 18-
ANYWAY , I WAS IN THE FRONT TABLE AND PAUL PUT SEVERAL LARGE MUGS OF BEER WITH HIS HARPS IN THEM ON MY TABLE. AFTER A FEW TUNES THIS SKINNY , GEEKY WHITE GUY COMMES UP FRONT AND ASKS TO SIT IN ON HARP !!!!! I'M THINKING THIS GUY MUST BE INSANE , BUT IT WAS " THE BLIND OWL" AL WILSON FROM CANNED HEAT ! AND MAYBE THEY NEVER DUETED AGAIN BUT I SAW IT !

jh

Blue Heron said...

Leslie and I have known Barry G for a long time, although it has been a while. Thanks for the neat story Jonathan. What a time! Got invited to a jam at Johnny Ecchols the other day through my buddy Arnold but couldn't make it.

Liz said...

You love Bloomfield so much because I was a Butterfield fan from way back. Bloomfield was not a lullaby to you (that would have been Harry Belafonte), but part of the wallpaper during periods when we were living in the same house.

Blue Heron said...

You are probably right, sister Liz. You did turn me on to Butterfield, specifically East West. You were responsible for a lot of my early musical interests including Janis, Stones and Zappa. I remember waiting for you outside the Fillmore East while you were enjoying an Airplane show. Also your Max's period.

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