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Peregrine flight

Saturday, March 6, 2010

Andreas Vollenweider - Dancing With The Lion

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

what next? Kitaro? Yanni? whatever...

"G"

Blue Heron said...

Music essentially is born as squiggly lines on paper or conceptualized abstractions in someone's head, it actualizes itself as tones, a tone is made of regular, evenly spaced waves of air molecules. The most noticeable difference between various tonal sounds is that some sound higher or lower than others. These differences in the pitch of the sound are caused by different spacing in the waves; the closer together the waves are, the higher the tone sounds. The spacing of the waves - the distance from the high point of one wave to the next one - is the wavelength.

All sound waves are travelling at about the same speed - the speed of sound. So waves with a longer wavelength don't arrive (at your ear, for example) as often (frequently) as the shorter waves. This aspect of a sound - how often a wave peak goes by, is called frequency by scientists and engineers. They measure it in hertz, which is how many wave peaks go by in one second. People can hear sounds that range from about 20 to about 17,000 hertz.

If these fast moving waves are abhorrent, one can merely duck one's head and the event will pass in little time, relieving one's self of such grave discomfort.

Anonymous said...

i rescind my earlier barb; as long as you just listen, and not watch, it ain't half bad; catchy tune really, it kinda grows on ya...g

Blue Heron said...

I actually like the early music videos the best, before MTV, you know Enya, Peter Gabriel, XTC, the fledgeling stuff. The artist were trodding on braver, conceptual ground. Something so halting and unpolished would never see the light of day today, when everything is so formulaic and boringly mass produced. So to me its like watching old silent movies just as speech is introduced, awkward but pleasant, and I view it as colors and shapes.

As for Andreas, I saw him at Symphony Hall, and he was totally incredible. I would see him again in a heartbeat. Like Harry Partch, he had invented many of his instruments, huge sheets of foil rolled down as percussion, it was brilliant.

Anonymous said...

am seriously digging this tune more and more each time i listen, it's very upbeat and positive sounding, which is what we all need at this time, like light overcoming darkness, so thanks for posting it...g