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love will keep us together

Thursday, December 4, 2008

Better Death through Chemistry










I don't trust people. No wait, that's a gross overstatement, after all, after gentle cajoling, most will return a borrowed book and maybe think twice about coveting your wife. But there are certain areas where homo sapiens are way out of their league, skill set and competence.

I point to genetic engineering for one. I don't care if we are referring to human experimentation or to the stuff that the FDA is allowing to happen to our seed storage and foodstuffs, man does not have sufficient intelligence to monkey around with his chemistry set to try to improve on the tried and true method of relying on millions of years of evolution. Or the six thousand years since the flood, for you people.

Last year I saw pics of a lady playing with twin cloned versions of her beloved deceased pooch. People will soon have the technology available to design boutique children, all of ideal standards of height, beauty, intelligence and gender. I am not sure if this is Huxleyan or Neitschean or maybe a mix of the two. Got to make way for the homo superior...

Today I read that our cotton seed stock is now contaminated with genetically modified varieties. It happened last year with corn. After the companies assured us that there was no way that the altered corn would cross pollinate anything. Now it's all over the world.

Mad scientists are sticking peanut genes in tomatoes, doing all kinds of weird experiments and I don't believe they have any idea of the potential negative ramifications of their actions. Of course this FDA is full of people who will probably be soon working for the companies that they were supposed to be regulating and have given them pretty much carte blanche to play Dr. Frankenstein at will. Someday we are going to need unmodified or uncorrupted seed, I just know it.

Experimental cotton unlikely to pose feed hazard.







By SAM HANANEL
The Associated Press
Wednesday, December 3, 2008; 7:20 PM
WASHINGTON -- An unauthorized strain of genetically modified cotton was accidentally mixed in with other harvested cotton in Texas last month, but government officials on Wednesday played down any safety concerns.

About a quarter ton of the experimental cotton seed engineered to contain a protein that produces a pesticide was combined with about 60 tons of commercial cotton growing nearby, said Eric Flamm, a senior adviser at the Food and Drug Administration.

The mixture, grown near Lamesa in West Texas, about 300 miles west of Fort Worth, was then stored along with 20,000 tons of commercial cotton seed in a warehouse. Nearly half the crop was processed into cottonseed oil and cotton meal to use as animal feed before officials at Monsanto Co., which grows the experimental cotton on a test plot, realized the mistake.


Monsanto officials notified the government of the error on Nov. 10.

"We're talking about a very small amount, but nevertheless, a material that contains a pesticidal substance and has not been authorized for food or feed use," Flamm said on a conference call with reporters.

Flamm said most of the contaminated crop that was processed into animal feed had already been consumed at cattle feed lots. Two truckloads of the crop were delivered to Mexico, and U.S. officials have notified that country.

The FDA, Environmental Protection Agency and Agriculture Department are investigating to determine what enforcement action is warranted against Monsanto.

Monsanto spokesman Lee Quarles said the crop was mistakenly harvested on Oct. 31, and the company learned about it eight days later when field researchers went to check on it and discovered it was not there. It is grown in a research plot adjacent to other cotton and separated by border rows.

"We've taken responsibility for this release and we're actively working to resolve it in a manner that's satisfactory with the USDA and other agencies," Quarles said.

Quarles said the protein has been determined to pose no threat to humans and approved for use in corn, but not yet in cotton.

But one food safety group said the case shows the need for stricter government regulation over experimental crops.

"This incident and a string of others that have come to light over the past two years show that the USDA is fundamentally incapable of protecting our food," said Karen Perry Stillerman, a food analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists.


Our actions don't stop at our border - I found this communique from Mexico on the net from 2002:


The ETC group (formerly RAFI) is releasing a new Communique today in an attempt to summarize the fractious scientific and political debate surrounding GM maize contamination in Mexico. The full text is available at www.etcgroup.org. The Communique is also a contribution to the Mexico City seminar of which ETC group is among the sponsoring organizations.1 For further background on the seminar, contact Silvia Ribeiro in Mexico City: silvia@etcgroup.org

After months of behind the scenes debate, both the Mexican Ministry of Environment and a peer-reviewed article in Nature confirmed last year that farmers' maize varieties in the states of Oaxaca and Puebla in Mexico, have been polluted with DNA from genetically modified (GM) maize. Mexico is the primary centre of maize genetic diversity. For years, scientists have warned that genes from GM plants could invade conventional varieties and their weedy relatives leading to superweeds and/or loss of biodiversity. The danger increases, scientists opined, if this takes place within the center of genetic diversity of a crop. However, now that GM contamination is a reality, some biotech scientists have undergone their own modification to become "spin doctors" for a frightened biotech industry. In the wake of the Nature revelation, GM apologists are implying that "if" contamination has taken place - and some challenge the peer-reviewed article on this point - then the menace is really a bonanza for local farmers. GM pollution means free technology transfer and increased biodiversity.

Civil society organizations in Mexico find such assumptions suspect. Last year, after all, the Bush Administration's less-than-militant Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned the planting of genetically modified Bt cotton in parts of southern Florida and now prohibits cultivation of commercial Bt cotton in Hawaii, the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico for fear that the transgenic material would cross into wild or feral cotton populations. "Until thorough research on the impacts of gene flow can be completed, restriction on where Bt cotton can be planted are being implemented," concluded EPA.2 Maize is much more prone to outbreeding than cotton. The United States is not a centre of diversity for cotton while Mexico is a major centre of maize diversity.

The flip-flop has stirred an unseemly public debate within the scientific community. Some researchers are attacking Dr. Ignacio Chapela, a Mexican scientist at UC Berkeley's Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and one of the authors of the Nature article. Chapela, in turn, according to an article in Nature Biotechnology (January, 2002) is warning that the maize gene bank at the International Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) outside of Mexico City is already contaminated with GM material.3 This is no small matter since the CIMMYT seed bank is the world's most important storage facility for endangered maize seed diversity. CIMMYT, however, has undertaken its own investigation and insists that they have found no contamination. Meanwhile, some Mexican authorities and scientists are arguing that contamination could be beneficial for Mexican biodiversity, ignoring or contradicting other government studies.

Outside of Mexico, biotech advocates and activists are looking on with alarm. Last year, severe drought in parts of Mexico and Central America led to large shipments of maize to peasant farmers as food aid. In desperation, many farmers saved some of the maize for planting. Since much of the food aid came from Canada and the USA - where GM maize is legal - many fear that all of Mesoamerica is now contaminated. As the corporations rev up GM wheat, rice and potatoes, the potential for similar scandals in Africa, Asia and the rest of Latin America also loom. Already, biotech meetings from Florence to The Hague to Alexandria are adjusting their agendas to address the issue.

If the biotech industry is panicked by this most recent debacle, the cloud of diminished biodiversity offers them a very silver lining. Don Westfall, a biotech industry consultant and vice-president of Promar International, summed up the plus side for the Toronto Star a year ago (January 9, 2001) when he told Canada's largest daily newspaper, "The hope of the industry is that over time the market is so flooded [with genetically modified organisms] that there's nothing you can do about it. You just sort of surrender."

Mexican farmers and civil society organizations meeting in Mexico City this week will discuss the situation and make clear their concerns and demands. The option to "surrender" is not on the agenda.

Here's another article I found in the New York Times archives:

U.S. to Buy Back Contaminated Corn

Published: March 8, 2001
The Agriculture Department said today that it would buy back corn seed suspected of contamination with StarLink, a bioengineered corn variety banned from human food.

The department estimated the cost of the program to be $15 million to $20 million.

The department said less than 1 percent of the nation's corn seed supply for spring planting was tainted with traces of the component in StarLink that protects young plants from destructive pests.

American farmers, food makers and grain handlers are especially nervous this year after small amounts of StarLink corn contaminated huge amounts of the nation's corn supply last year. That led to a recall of more than 300 kinds of taco shells, corn snacks and other foods from grocery shelves. StarLink is not allowed in human food because of concerns that it may cause allergic reactions. The genetically modified corn is made by Aventis CropScience.










Here is a list of currently allowable genetically modified items as of 9/08:
This list is current as of September 9, 2008 and therefore, does not show any consultations completed after that date. This list will be updated within approximately one month of a completed consultation.

Completed Submissions Organized by Year and File Number (BNF No.)
Submissions Completed in 2008

BNF No. 111, Submitted June 28, 2007 by Pioneer Hi-Bred, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn Glyphosate N-acetyltransferase (GAT), modified acetolactate synthase (ZM-HRA) Bacillus licheniformis; corn Tolerance to both acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides and the herbicide glyphosate Event 98140 Sept. 9, 2008 Sept. 9, 2008
Submissions Completed in 2007

BNF No. 108, Submitted November 16, 2006 by Pioneer Hi-Bred, For use in Human food and animal feed
Soybean Glyphosate N-acetyltransferase (GAT), modified acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA) Bacillus licheniformis; soybean Tolerance to both acetolactate synthase-inhibiting herbicides and the herbicide glyphosate Event 356043 Sep 21, 2007 Sep 21, 2007
BNF No. 107, Submitted October 13, 2006 by Monsanto Company, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2 Bacillus thuringiensis subspp. aizawai and kurstaki Resistance to Lepidopteran insects MON 89034 Aug 8, 2007 July 25, 2007
BNF No. 95, Submitted August 31, 2005 by Syngenta Seeds, Inc., For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn AMY797E alpha-amylase Three microbes from order Thermococcales Alpha-amylase expression Event 3272 Aug 7, 2007 Aug 7, 2007
BNF No. 104, Submitted March 26, 2006 by Monsanto Company, For use in Human food and animal feed
Soybean 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate MON 89788 (MON-89788-1) Jan 19, 2007 Jan 19, 2007
BNF No. 99, Submitted February 23, 2005 by Syngenta Seeds, Inc., For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Cry3A Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Tenebrionis Resistance to corn rootworm MIR604 Jan 30, 2007 Jan 30, 2007
Submissions Completed in 2005

BNF No. 98, Submitted May 27, 2004 by Monsanto Company, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate MON-88913-8 Mar 7, 2005 Mar 7, 2005
BNF No. 97, Submitted March 30, 2004 by Monsanto Company, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Cry3Bb1;
5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kumamotoensis;
Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Resistance to corn rootworm;
Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate
MON 88017 Jan 12, 2005 Jan 5, 2005
BNF No. 94, Submitted October 27, 2003 by Syngenta Seeds, Inc., For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton* VIP3A protein B. thuringiensis, strain AB88 Resistance to lepidopteran insects Transformation Event COT102 Jul 8, 2005 Jul 7, 2005
BNF No. 87, Submitted August 10, 2004 by Monsanto Company, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) Corynebacterium glutamicum Increase lysine level for use in animal feed REN-ØØØ38-3 or Maize Event LY038 Oct 5, 2005 Sep 30, 2005
Submissions Completed in 2004

BNF No. 93, Submitted June 30, 2003 by Mycogen Seeds c/o Dow AgroSciences LLC, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Cry1F;
phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai;
Streptomyces hygroscopicus Resistance to certain lepidopteran insects;
Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium
Event TC6275 June 30, 2004 June 28, 2004
BNF No. 92, Submitted March 18, 2003 by Mycogen Seeds c/o Dow AgroSciences LLC, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton* Cry1Ac;
phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki;
Streptomyces viridochromogenes Resistance to certain Lepidopteran insects;
Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium
Event 3006-210-23 August 3, 2004 July 28, 2004
BNF No. 90, Submitted April 16, 2003 by Monsanto Company and KWS SAAT AG, For use in Human food and animal feed
Sugar Beet 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine)
Event H7-1 August 17, 2004 August 7, 2004
BNF No. 85, Submitted March 17, 2003 by Mycogen Seeds c/o Dow AgroSciences LLC, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton* Cry1F;
phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai;
Streptomyces viridochromogenes Resistance to lepidopteran insects;
Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium
Event 281-24-236 May 10, 2004 May 5, 2004
BNF No. 84, Submitted October 6, 2003 by Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics, For use in Human food and animal feed
Alfalfa 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate Event J101 and Event J163 Dec. 10, 2004 Dec. 8, 2004
BNF No. 81, Submitted December 11, 2003 by Mycogen Seeds c/o Dow AgroSciences LLC, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Cry34Ab1, Cry35Ab1, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT)
Bacillus thuringiensis strain PS149B1;
Streptomyces viridochromogenes Resistance to Coleopteran insects;
Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium
DAS-59122-7 October 4, 2004 September 28, 2004
BNF No. 80, Submitted June 28, 2002 by Monsanto Company, For use in Human food and animal feed
Wheat 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) MON 71800 July 22, 2004 July 22, 2004
Submissions Completed in 2003

BNF No. 86, Submitted August 30, 2002 by Bayer CropScience USA LP, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces hygroscopicus Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium LLCotton25 Apr. 2, 2003 June 5, 2003
BNF No. 79, Submitted September 13, 2002 by Monsanto and The Scotts Company, For use in animal feed
Creeping bentgrass 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. Strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate Event ASR368 Sep. 23, 2003 Sep. 11, 2003
Submissions Completed in 2002

BNF No. 77, Submitted April 30, 2001 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Oilseed rape (Canola) 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS); Glyphosate oxidoreductase (GOX) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4, Ochrobactrum anthropi strain LBAA Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate GT200 Sep. 5, 2002 Sep. 4, 2002
BNF No. 74, Submitted June 29, 2000 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton* Cry2ab; Cry1ac Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kumamotoensis Resistance to lepidopteran insects 15985 July 18, 2002 July 16, 2002
Submissions Completed in 2001

BNF No. 75, Submitted September 25, 2000 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Modified Cry3Bb1 Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kumamotoensis Resistance to coleopteran insects, including corn rootworm MON 863 Dec. 31, 2001 Dec. 31, 2001
BNF No. 73, Submitted June 28, 2000 by Dow AgroSciences LLC, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* Cry1F protein; Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus thuringiensis; Streptomyces viridochromogenes Resistance to certain lepidopteran insects; tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium 1507 May 18, 2001 June 8, 2001
Submissions Completed in 2000

BNF No. 71, Submitted February 28, 2000 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate NK603 Oct. 18, 2000 Oct. 9, 2000
BNF No. 66, Submitted June 7, 1999 by Aventis Crop Science, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn Barnase; Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Streptomyces hygroscopicus Male Sterility; tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium MS6 Apr. 4, 2000 Apr. 4, 2000
BNF No. 63, Submitted November 30, 1999 by Aventis Crop Science, For use in Human food and animal feed
Rice Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces hygroscopicus Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium LLRICE E06; LLRICE E62 Aug. 31, 2000 Aug. 30, 2000
Submissions Completed in 1999

BNF No. 64, Submitted May 10, 1999 by Rhone-Poulenc, For use in Human food and animal feed
Canola Nitrilase Klebsiella ozaenae subsp. ozaenae Tolerance to the herbicide bromoxynil OXY-235 Oct. 20, 1999 Oct. 13, 1999
BNF No. 60, Submitted May 5, 1999 by Agritope, For use in Human food
Cantaloupe S-adenosylmethionine hydrolase E. coli bacteriophage T3 Delayed fruit ripening due to reduced ethylene synthesis A and B Dec. 9, 1999 Oct. 20, 1999
BNF No. 52, Submitted Nov. 13, 1997 by BASF, For use in animal feed
Canola Phytase Aspergillus niger van Tieghem Degradation of phytate in animal feed MPS961, 962, 963, 964, 965 July 2, 1999 Mar. 4, 1999
Submissions Completed in 1998


BNF No. 57 Submitted May 29, 1998 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Canola Barnase; Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Streptomyces hygroscopicus Male sterility; Tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium MS8 Sep. 16, 1998 Aug. 5, 1998
BNF No. 57, Submitted May 29, 1998 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Canola Barstar; Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Streptomyces hygroscopicus Fertility restorer; Tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium RF3 Sep. 16, 1998 Aug. 5, 1998
BNF No. 56, Submitted June 5, 1998 by Monsanto and Novartis Seeds, For use in Human food and animal feed
Sugar beet 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate GTS B77 Nov. 3, 1998 Sep. 28, 1998
BNF No. 55, Submitted March 31, 1998 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Soybean Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium A2704-12, A5547-127 May 15, 1998 Apr. 21, 1998
BNF No. 54, Submitted Dec. 22, 1997 by Calgene, For use in Human food
Tomato* CryIAc protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to certain lepidopteran insects 5345 Feb. 24, 1998 Feb. 3, 1998
BNF No. 51, Submitted Aug. 20, 1997 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn Modified 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Corn Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate GA21 Feb. 13, 1998 Feb. 10, 1998
BNF No. 50, Submitted Oct. 27, 1997 by U of Saskatchewan, For use in Human food and animal feed
Flax Acetolactate synthase (csr-1) Arabidopsis Tolerance to the herbicide sulfonylurea CDC Triffid May 15, 1998 Mar. 24, 1998
BNF No. 49, Submitted Aug. 4, 1997 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Potato* CryIIIA; PVY coat protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis (Btt); Potato virus Y (PVY) Resistance to Colorado potato beetle and PVY SEMT15-02, SEMT15-15, SEMT15-07, HLMT15-3, HLMT15-15, HLMT15-46, RBMT15-10 Jan. 8, 1998 Jan. 2, 1998
BNF No. 48, Submitted July 21, 1997 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Potato* CryIIIA; PLRV Replicase Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis (Btt); Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) Resistance to Colorado potato beetle and PLRV RBMT21-129
-152
-350
RBMT22-82
-186
-238
-262
Jan. 8, 1998 Jan. 2, 1998
BNF No. 47, Submitted Sep. 18, 1997 by Calgene, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton* Nitrilase; Cry1Ac protein Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaene; Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) Tolerance to the herbicide bromoxynil; Resistance to certain lepidopteran insects 31707, 31803, 31807, 31808, 42317 Jan. 28, 1998 Dec. 12, 1997
BNF No. 41, Submitted Mar. 3, 1998 by AgrEvo, For use in animal feed
Corn* Cry9C protein; Phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi (Bt); Streptomyces hygroscopicus Resistance to several lepidopteran insects; Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium CBH35-1 May 29, 1998 May 29, 1998
BNF No. 38, Submitted June 19, 1998 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Sugar beet Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium T120-7 Oct. 8, 1998 Sep. 9, 1998
BNF No. 36, Submitted Apr. 15, 1998 by Pioneer Hi-Bred, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn DNA adenine methylase (DAM); Phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) Escherichia coli; Streptomyces viridochromogenes Male sterility; tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium 676, 678, 680 Dec. 24, 1998 Dec. 11, 1998
Submissions Completed in 1997

BNF No. 46, Submitted May 29, 1997 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Canola Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium T45 Aug. 25, 1997 Aug. 18, 1997
BNF No. 45, Submitted May 20, 1997 by Bejo Zaden BV, For use in Human food
Radicchio Barnase; phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Streptomyces hygroscopicus Male Sterility; tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium RM3-3, RM3-4, RM3-6 Oct. 22, 1997 Oct. 16, 1997
BNF No. 43, Submitted Feb. 26, 1997 by Seminis Vegetable Seeds, For use in Human food
Squash* Coat proteins from CMV, ZYMV, and WMV2 Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), and watermelon mosaic virus 2 (WMV2) Resistance to the viruses CMV, ZYMV and WMV2 CZW3 July 10, 1997 July 1, 1997
BNF No. 42, Submitted Jan. 3, 1997 by U of Hawaii, For use in Human food
Papaya* PRV coat protein Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) Resistance to PRSV 55-1 Sep. 19, 1997 Sep. 12, 1997
BNF No. 40, Submitted Sep. 30, 1996 by Dekalb Genetics, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* CryIAc Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to European corn borer DBT418 Mar. 11, 1997 Mar. 11, 1997
BNF No. 39, Submitted Aug. 28, 1996 by DuPont, For use in Human food and animal feed
Soybean GmFad2-1 gene to suppress endogenous GmFad2-1 gene, which encodes delta-12 desaturase Soybean High oleic acid soybean oil G94-1, G94-19, G94-168 Mar. 14, 1997 Dec. 5, 1996
Submissions Completed in 1996

BNF No. 35, Submitted July 2, 1996 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* CryIAb protein
5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS); Glyphosate oxidoreductase Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk); Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4; Ochrobactrum anthropi Resistance to European corn borer; Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate MON 802, MON 805, MON 830, MON 831, MON 832 Nov. 5, 1996 Sep. 6, 1996
BNF No. 34, Submitted June 6, 1996 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* CryIAb protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to European corn borer MON 809, MON 810 Sep. 25, 1996 Sep. 18, 1996
BNF No. 33, Submitted Jan. 24, 1996 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Potato* CryIIIA protein Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis (Btt) Resistance to Colorado potato beetle ATBT04-6, ATBT04-27, ATBT04-30, ATBT04-31, ATBT04-36, SPBT02-5, SPBT02-7 Apr. 4, 1996 Mar. 25, 1996
BNF No. 32, Submitted July 6, 1995 by Plant Genetic Systems, N.V., For use in Human food and animal feed
Oilseed rape Barnase; phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Streptomyces hygroscopicus Male sterility; tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium MS1[B91-4] Apr. 4, 1996 Mar. 25, 1996
BNF No. 32, Submitted July 6, 1995 and Oct. 23, 1995 by Plant Genetic Systems, N.V., For use in Human food and animal feed
Oilseed rape (Canola) Barstar; phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Streptomyces hygroscopicus Fertility restorer; tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium RF1[B93-101], RF2[B94-2] Apr. 4, 1996 Mar. 25, 1996
BNF No. 31, Submitted Jan. 12, 1996 by Plant Genetic Systems (America), Inc., For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn Barnase; phosphinothricin acetyl transferase (PAT) Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Streptomyces hygroscopicus Male sterility; tolerance to glufosinate-ammonium MS3 June 7, 1996 Mar. 15, 1996
BNF No. 30, Submitted Feb. 21, 1996 by DuPont, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton Acetolactate synthase (ALS) Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi (Tobacco) Tolerance to the herbicide sulfonylurea 19-51a June 28, 1996 June 28, 1996
BNF No. 28, Submitted Nov. 17, 1995 by Dekalb Genetics, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces hygroscopicus Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium DLL25 Mar. 8, 1996 Jan. 25, 1996
BNF No. 18, Submitted Sep. 15, 1995 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* CryIAb protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to European corn borer MON 801 July 24, 1996 July 22, 1996
BNF No. 17, Submitted Oct. 25, 1995 by Northrup King, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* CryIAb protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to European corn borer Bt11 May 22, 1996 May 22, 1996
BNF No. 14, Submitted Jan. 16, 1996 by Agritope, For use in Human food
Tomato S-adenosylmethionine hydrolase Escherichia coli bacteriophage T3 Delayed fruit ripening due to reduced ethylene synthesis 35-1-N Mar. 20, 1996 Feb. 22, 1996
Submissions Completed in 1995

BNF No. 29, Submitted Aug. 29, 1995 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium T14, T25 Dec. 14, 1995 Dec. 12, 1995
BNF No. 26, Submitted Apr. 13, 1995 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate 1445, 1698 Sep. 8, 1995 Sep. 8, 1995
BNF No. 25, Submitted Aug. 17, 1992 by Calgene, For use in Human food and animal feed
Oilseed rape (Canola) 12:0 acyl carrier protein thioesterase Umbellularia californica (California Bay) High laurate canola oil 23 July 13, 1995 Apr. 4, 1995
BNF No. 24, Submitted Mar. 2, 1995 by Ciba Geigy, For use in Human food and animal feed
Corn* CryIAb protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to European corn borer 176 July 14, 1995 July 14, 1995
BNF No. 23, Submitted Mar. 17, 1995 by AgrEvo, For use in Human food and animal feed
Oilseed rape (Canola) Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase(PAT) Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate-ammonium HCN92 Apr. 20, 1995 Mar. 17, 1995
BNF No. 20, Submitted Apr. 3, 1995 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Oilseed rape (Canola) 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS); Glyphosate oxidoreductase (GOX) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4, Achromobacter sp. strain LBAA Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate GT73 Sep. 26, 1995 Sep. 26, 1995
BNF No. 13, Submitted Nov. 21, 1994 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton* CryIAc protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) Resistance to cotton ballworm, pink bollworm, and tobacco budworm 531 June 1, 1995 Feb. 27, 1995
757, 1076 May 30, 1995
BNF No. 07, Submitted Sep. 16, 1994 by DNA Plant Technology, For use in Human food
Tomato A fragment of the gene encoding amino cyclopropane carboxylic acid synthase (ACCS) to suppress the endogenous ACCS enzyme Tomato Delayed ripening due to reduced ethylene synthesis 1345-4 Apr. 5, 1995 Oct. 4, 1994
BNF No. 06, Submitted Sep. 6, 1994 by Asgrow, For use in Human food
Squash* ZYMV and WMV2 coat proteins Zuchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and watermelon mosaic virus 2 (WMV2) Resistance to ZYMV and WMV2 ZW20 Apr. 5, 1995 Oct. 3, 1994
BNF No. 05, Submitted Aug. 25, 1994 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Potato* CryIIIA protein Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis (Btt) Resistance to Colorado potato beetle BT6, BT10, BT12, BT16, BT17, BT18, and BT23 Apr. 5, 1995 Sep. 23, 1994
BNF No. 04, Submitted June 14, 1994 by Calgene, For use in Human food and animal feed
Cotton Nitrilase Klebsiella ozaenae Tolerance to the herbicide Bromoxynil BXN cotton Apr. 5, 1995 Sep. 20, 1994
BNF No. 03, Submitted Sep. 6, 1994 by Zeneca, For use in Human food
Tomato A fragment of the polygalacturonase (PG) gene to suppress the endogenous PG enzyme Tomato Delayed softening due to reduced pectin degradation B, Da, F Apr. 5, 1995 Sep. 20, 1994
BNF No. 02, Submitted Aug. 26, 1994 by Monsanto, For use in Human food
Tomato 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACCD) Pseudomonas chlororaphis Delayed softening due to reduced ethylene synthesis 8338 Apr. 5, 1995 Sep. 19, 1994
BNF No. 01, Submitted Sep. 2, 1994 by Monsanto, For use in Human food and animal feed
Soybean 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 Tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate 40-3-2 Jan. 27, 1995 Sep. 19, 1994

I also include a synopsis of the food engineering debate from Wikipedia:

Many scientists[22] argue that there is more than enough food in the world and that the hunger crisis is caused by problems in food distribution and politics, not production, so people should not be offered food that may carry some degree of risk.[23][24]
Genetic modifications often have significant unforeseen consequences, both in the initially modified organisms and their environments. For example, certain strains of maize have been developed that are toxic to plant eating insects (see Bt corn). It has been alleged those strains cross-pollinated with other varieties of wild and domestic maize and passed on these genes with a putative impact on Maize biodiversity.[25] Subsequent to the publication of these results, several scientists pointed out that the conclusions were based on experiments with design flaws. It is well known that the results from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods of analysing DNA can often be confounded by sample contamination and experimental artifacts. Appropriate controls can be included in experiments to eliminate these as a possible explanation of the results - however these controls were not included in the methods used by Quist and Chapela.[26] After this criticism Nature, the scientific journal where this data was originally published concluded that "the evidence available is not sufficient to justify the publication of the original paper".[27] More recent attempts to replicate the original studies have concluded that genetically modified corn is absent from southern Mexico in 2003 and 2004 [28]. Also in dispute is the impact on biodiversity of the introgression of transgenes into wild populations [6]. Unless a transgene offers a massive selective advantage in a wild population, a transgene that enters such a population will be maintained at a low gene frequency. In such situations it can be argued that such an introgression actually increases biodiversity rather than lowers it.
Activists and many scientists opposed to genetic engineering say that with current recombinant technology there is no way to ensure that genetically modified organisms will remain under control, and the use of this technology outside secure laboratory environments represents multiple unacceptable risks to both farmed and wild ecosystems.
Potential impact on biodiversity may occur if herbicide-tolerant crops are sprayed with herbicide to the extent that no wild plants ('weeds') are able to survive. Plants toxic to insects may mean insect-free crops. This could result in declines in other wildlife (e.g. birds) which feed on weed seeds and/or insects for food resources. The recent (2003) farm scale studies in the UK found this to be the case with GM sugar beet and GM rapeseed, but not with GM maize (though in the last instance, the non-GM comparison maize crop had also been treated with environmentally-damaging pesticides subsequently (2004) withdrawn from use in the EU).
Although some scientists have claimed that selective breeding is a form of genetic engineering,[29] (e.g., maize was modified from teosinte, dogs have evolved with human intervention over the course of tens of thousands of years from wolves), others assert that modern transgenesis-based genetic engineering is capable of delivering changes faster than, and sometimes of different types from, traditional breeding methods.[30]
Proponents of current genetic techniques as applied to food plants cite hypothetical benefits that the technology may have, for example, in the harsh agricultural conditions of Africa. They say that with modifications, existing crops could possibly be able to thrive under the relatively hostile conditions providing much needed food to their people. Proponents also cite golden rice and golden rice 2, genetically engineered rice varieties (still under development) that contain genetically-modified elevated vitamin A levels. Some hope that this rice may alleviate vitamin A deficiency that contributes to the death of millions and permanent blindness of 500,000 annually.[31]
Proponents claim that genetically-engineered crops, although patented for economic benefit, are not significantly different from those modified by nature or humans in the past. They also argue that modified crops are as safe, or even safer, than those created through such time-tested methods. There is gene transfer between unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes. They argue that animal husbandry, Food Irradiation and crop breeding are also forms of genetic engineering that use artificial selection instead of modern genetic modification techniques. It is politics, they argue, not economics or science, that causes their work to be closely investigated, and for different standards to apply to it than those applied to other forms of agricultural technology.
Proponents also believe the technology could possibly prove harmless because species or genetic barriers have been crossed in nature in the past, sometimes utilizing other better time-tested and natural methods. An oft-cited example is today's modern red wheat variety, which is the result of two natural crossings made long ago. It is made up of three groups of seven chromosomes. Each of those three groups came from a different wild wheat grass. First, a cross between two of the grasses occurred, creating the durum wheats, which were the commercial grains of the first civilizations up through the Roman Republic. Then a cross occurred between that 14-chromosome durum wheat and another wild grass to create what became modern red wheat at the time of the Roman Empire.


We do not have the intelligence to ever think through the myriad potential effects of the decisions we will make to genetically re-engineer the world.  On flora, on fauna, on humans, on other countries.  I think that we proceed down this path at our peril.


4 comments:

segue said...

No reason to diet today--the dogwoman picture made me sick.
Where do you find these things?

Anonymous said...

It took me a while to search on the net, only your site explain the fully details, bookmarked and thanks again.

- Kris

Anonymous said...

This is stupid.

Anonymous said...

You'll want to add a facebook button to your blog. I just bookmarked this article, although I had to complete it manually. Simply my $.02 :)

- Robson